Call

Make a Change Today

Call: 888.963.3432

Super Food List & Healthy Recipes

Author: Cara Walsh

March 24, 2014

Super Food List & Healthy Recipes

Author: Cara Walsh

March 24, 2014


What are “Super foods”?
They are nutrition packed foods with high levels of nutrients and health benefits with the fewest number of calories. Super foods are nutritional powerhouses that help build bones, prevent chronic diseases, improve eyesight, and even keep your mind sharp. Many of these super foods have significant health benefits and there are countless reasons to include these foods in your diet daily. Utilize the super food list below to determine what foods will benefit your current weight loss plans and how you can incorporate them into your daily life.

Food
Nutrients
Benefits
How to prepare
Crucifers (Broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts) Vitamins A, C, K, fiber Fight carcinogens and prevent cancer Raw, steamed, stir-fried
Asparagus Folic acid Aids in blood cell formation, growth, as well as prevention of liver disease and spina bifida Steamed, stir-fried; add to salads or rice dishes
Leafy green vegetables (dark leaf lettuces, spinach, chard, kale) Niacin, zinc, folate, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, calcium, potassium, iron, fiber Healthy circulation, blood cells, immune and digestive system function Use in soups, quiches, salads, or ethnic dishes
Orange-fleshed carbohydrates (pumpkin, sweet potato, carrot) Vitamins A, C; calcium; potassium Healthy immune system, strong bones, healthy kidney function and muscle contraction Buy canned or fresh, add to soups, pies, casseroles
Berries (blueberries, cranberries, raspberries, strawberries, blackberries, etc.) High in vitamin C, antioxidants, phytonutrients**, flavonoids, potassium, magnesium, folate, fiber Cranberries benefit urinary health; all berries assist in a healthy immune system, strong connective tissue, healthy vision, and cancer prevention Eat as a snack; add to cereal or yogurt, muffins, breads, smoothies, jellies, chutneys
Cold water fish (wild salmon, herring, sardines) Omega-3 fatty acids, protein Reduce inflammation and cholesterol, build muscle, heart health, mental health Smoke, grill, bake, use instead of meat in tacos or over salad
Nuts and seeds (walnuts, brazil nuts, cashews, almonds, etc.) Omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin E, selenium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, fiber, protein Regulate blood flow; improve cardiovascular kidney and neurological health Snack on raw nuts and seeds; add to cereals, yogurt, trail mixes, salads and cooked dishes, such as stir-fries and soups
Eggs Vitamins A, B12, D; riboflavin, carotenoids, iron Better neurological function and reduced inflammation. Carotenoids helps protect against cancer, heart disease, and contribute to healthy eyes. Prepared scrambled, hard boiled, in salads,
Yogurt (low-fat, greek, naturally sweetened or plain) Calcium; vitamin D, B2, and B12; riboflavin, beneficial bacteria Healthy digestion, strong bones, improved mood, nervous and immune system function, protein and red blood cell metabolism Eat as a snack; use as a sauce for Indian or Greek dishes, or as a base for dips, salad dressings, fruit and yogurt parfaits
Legumes (beans, lentils, peanuts, soybeans) Folate, iron, zinc, calcium, fiber, protein Healthy blood cell formation and function, bone strength, digestion and cell regrowth throughout the body Base for hummus and dips; mix with rice for complete protein; soups, stews, casseroles, in tacos, as side dish, salads
Whole grain (quinoa, barley, millet, oats, flax, etc.) Manganese, magnesium, iron, protein, riboflavin, fiber, phosphorus, selenium Reduce headaches; improve heart health, digestion, blood sugar regulation, cell development, and energy metabolism Eat in place of rice or other grains during meals, include in soups; make a hearty breakfast; add to breads
Green Tea Flavonoids* (ECGC) Anticancer and antioxidant activity Drink hot or iced; add to smoothies
Dark Chocolate Antioxidant, potassium, copper, magnesium, iron Prevent oxidative damage to cells, prevent stroke and cardiovascular disease, blood pressure, prevent type 2-diabetes On fruit, graham crackers, sugar free pudding

*Phytochemical: a plant chemical that helps to keep plants healthy. These same plant chemicals help protect humans from disease and boost the immune system.*Carotenoid: a type of phytochemical that has a strong antioxidant effect. A diet rich in carotenoids helps protect against cancer and heart disease and contribute to healthy eyes.*Flavonoid: a large family of polyphenolic compounds synthesized by plants. They function in the body as antioxidants, which can protect blood vessels, protect cells from oxidative damage, and prevent inflammation.

See a few super food recipes below!

Spinach Smoothie

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup fresh spinach
  • 1 cup chopped frozen mango
  • 1 tsp fresh grated ginger
  • 1 tbsp fresh mint, packed
  • 1/2 cup light coconut milk
  • 1/2 cup coconut water {or regular water}

Directions:

Place all ingredients in a blender and process until completely smooth. Serve immediately.

Tuna Salad with Greek yogurt

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon nonfat plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest plus 1 tablespoon juice
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 can (5 ounces) solid light tuna packed in water, drained and flaked
  • 1 stalk celery, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced
  • 1/2 Granny Smith apple, peeled and grated
  • Whole-wheat bread, red onion, cucumber, and alfalfa sprouts, for serving

Directions:

Whisk together mayonnaise, yogurt, and lemon zest and juice; season with salt and pepper. Stir in tuna, celery, and apple. Serve with bread, onion, cucumber, and sprouts.

About the Author:

Cara Walsh
Counselor at The Carmel Mountain Ranch Medifast Weight Control Center

Cara Walsh is a Registered Dietitian and Certified Weight Control Counselor. Cara received her bachelor’s degree in Nutritional Science from San Diego State University and completed her dietetic internship to become a registered dietitian through the Utah State University. Cara is currently completing her Masters in Dietetic Administration through Utah State University. Cara has always had a passion for healthy eating and cooking. She loves to focus on how food can heal and provide nutrition-while tasting delicious. Cara thrives on helping others reach their full potential nutritionally. In her spare time she enjoys reading, going to Pilates and running the boardwalk on the Pacific Ocean with her son and husband.

Post like this:

What is the Whole Food Diet?
High Protein Food List
Guide to Eating Healthy on Thanksgiving
What Are the Benefits of Losing Weight?
Healthy Halloween